Celebrating Instructional Coaches Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow, Always

I was recently asked about the impact an instructional coach can have on an organization by a well-respected colleague. My first physical response, a genuine smile. My first internal thought, now THIS is a thoughtful question and a meaningful conversation I can’t wait to be a part of. Then, the words from my grateful heart said, “I appreciate you being interested in the work of an instructional coach, really THANK YOU!” I believe in the work of instructional coaches and will highlight and celebrate their work every chance I get. As I stated in my previous blog post titled Instructional Coaching Mindsets Move Practice, “When you are deeply passionate about education, the students, colleagues, and community you serve, coaching is the most meaningful opportunity to make an impact on instructional practices at the district, building, teacher, and student levels. Coaching is an opportunity to show schools they are capable of changing practices while honoring the ones that work for our students. Coaching creates spaces to reflect on the past, confront the present, and make plans to shape the future.”

I served in the role of instructional coach for five years and without the experience, I am not sure if I’d be the leader I am evolving into today. Let me be clear, I am well-aware that it is not a role that is easily understood in an educational organization and perhaps not embraced by all. There are times when the work of a coach may not always be visible or noticed, especially when coaches are in the midst of researching, gathering resources, preparing professional learning experiences, and refining curriculum. Instructional coaching is a role that rests on the shoulders of mutual understanding, partnership, collaboration, connection, reciprocity, and trust. I will always celebrate the work of instructional coaches because it’s a role that is capable of shifting approaches to teaching and learning while keeping your most precious stakeholders at the heart of decision-making, students. 

While the epicenter of the role is cultivating strong relationships with teachers, this takes time and patience. Instructional coaches, I am celebrating you because I know you do not give up on this process because you know the colleagues and students you serve are worth it. You also understand that your role will not be palatable for all. I’ll admit, when I was a coach, perhaps I wasn’t for everyone. I wasn’t okay with it then, but l’m at peace with it now. I am not perfect…I’m always a work in progress. Could I have been better at times? Sure. Could I have tried harder at times? Sure. Could I have been more empathetic at times? Sure. Could I have smiled more consistently? Sure. Could I have misunderstood the needs of others? Sure. Overtime, I have reflected on every interaction I’ve experienced. I attribute the solid collection of interactions I’ve endured to shaping the leader I am and are continuously striving to be. Living this role paved the way to practices I passionately employ as an instructional leader today. The coaching mindset I embrace is an invitation to grow, support, and distribute leadership across an organization while keeping the focus on teaching and learning.

Coaches, as you embark on a new school year, I am celebrating YOU and the work you continue to embark on to create spaces to reflect on the past, confront the present, and make plans to shape the future of education.

I am celebrating you because I know that growing into your role will require an armor of vulnerability, fortitude, confidence, and intuition. Your intellectual courage and emotional intelligence will encourage teachers to use their voices to reflect on the educators they were, are, and are striving to be! 

I am celebrating you because you are nurturing relationships with teachers that will cultivate an inspirational culture of learning for your educational communities.

I am celebrating you because you are navigating relationships between administration and teachers to build bridges to meaningful teaching and learning opportunities.

I am celebrating you because you put yourselves into vulnerable places when you are co-creating lessons and modeling best instructional practices with your colleagues present.

I am celebrating you because you are elevating and recognizing teachers’ gifts, honoring their practices, recognizing their work, and cross-pollinating ideas with other teachers and educational communities.

I am celebrating you because you are working tirelessly to refine curriculum, instruction, and assessments with teachers to personalize instruction and meet the needs of all learners. 

I am celebrating you because you are endlessly supporting teachers, serving as mentors, and participating in purposeful conversations as a thinking partner and guide.

I am celebrating you because you are creating relevant resources and swiftly getting them into the hands of educators who need them. 

I am celebrating you because you are intentionally creating inspiring and motivating professional learning experiences that fit into the mission, vision, and priorities of your school districts.

Coaches, I am celebrating YOU!  Your school districts made an important commitment to investing in continuous job-embedded professional learning and creating spaces for your work to blossom and grow. 

Keep throwing yourself into the work you believe in with your whole heart. Keep living it and loving it because education needs you. You became an instructional coach because you have made positive contributions to the field of education. Someone believed that your impact is capable of influencing and inspiring others while you work toward building capacity from within.  I’m an instructional coach at heart and will continue to celebrate your work yesterday, today, tomorrow, and always.

Observing Through a Coaching Lens: 8 Ideas to Lift the Level of Conversation and Transform Practice

Reflecting on Observations

This is my 16th year in education and it is safe to say that my growth and development as a human being and educator rests on the shoulders of those who generously took the time to ask me about what worked well and what didn’t. They gave me the time and space to freely collaborate, think, reflect, and embrace my successes and failures (and there were many). When considering all of the productive conversations I have had about teaching and learning, I have discovered that there were a handful of observations that lifted the level of my instruction and landed at the forefront of my mind. I have been formally observed approximately 35 times over the course of my career. The conversations that moved me forward weren’t necessarily the ones that involved a formal write-up or rubric. It was the in-the-moment dialogue, the reciprocal nature of those meaningful exchanges, and the authenticity of the process that led me to taking new paths to a destination.

Shifting the Observation Narrative

I’ll admit, the trajectory of my career has been beautiful. Having served many communities in different roles, I quickly recognized that each building had a wide range of strengths and opportunities for growth. Having been a teaching assistant, classroom teacher, elementary and middle school literacy specialist, instructional coach, and mentor coordinator K-12, these experiences have collectively afforded me opportunities to speak with a plethora of administrators, teachers, mentors, students, and families who have impacted the way I approach teaching and learning. Throughout this time, I have considered many different perspectives, sifted through various curricula, collaborated on the writing of curricula, have attended and presented many professional learning experiences, and have coached and taught many teachers and students. I have also recognized that every educator adds value to a conversation, and those who serve on the frontlines have tremendous insight into where they need to grow. As I stepped into the role of assistant principal this year, my journey has led me to think about how I can shift the narrative of observations and ask myself, How can I be the administrator I always needed during the observation process? AND How can I capitalize on my teaching and coaching experiences to elevate and support the educators I serve?

I have always appreciated the role of a coach, a thinking partner, a knowledgeable colleague who can help me see things differently than I may have seen them before. Before I proceed, allow me to share Jim Knight’s definition of a coach from his website:

Grounding the Work

An instructional coach is a dedicated partner for teachers, providing evidence-based practices that improve teaching and learning so students everywhere can be more successful.

Before I share some ideas, let me be clear that I am not embarking on this work alone. My principal and I are approaching observations through a coaching lens together. This is a shared experience that will ultimately support and cultivate a culture of collaboration that will directly impact student achievement. As we move this important work forward together, we recognize that this is a journey and we have only planted the seeds for experiences we will continue to develop and grow.

Observing Through a Coaching Lens: 8 Ideas to Lift the Level of Conversation & Transform Practice

CLICK HERE to print out the card for discussion

  1. Less Evaluative and More Collaborative: Approach conversations as a thinking partner. There are no titles in teaching and learning discussions. Keep the conversations focused on the learner and the learning. In the book Innovate Inside the Box by George Couros and Dr. Katie Novak, George identifies 3 critical areas for learning by educators and why they are crucial. 1. Learn about our students 2. Learn for our students 3. Learn from our students. The same applies during a collaborative conversation between an administrator and teacher: 1. Learn about our teachers 2. Learn for our teachers 3. Learn from our teachers. There is no one who knows themselves and their learners better than the teacher themselves.
  2. Root in the Mission and Vision: When I was onboarded to the assistant principal role, one of the 1st documents my principal shared with me was the District’s mission and vision. I am still in awe of the time, thought, and collaborative effort that had gone into creating this document. This isn’t a document that is simply just posted on the District website. This is a document that lives and breathes in every conversation we embark on. The language and meaning are easily embedded into observations, informal conversations, professional learning experiences, and presentations. In discussing teaching and learning with teachers and planning instruction, we look back at the mission and vision together and intentionally reflect on student outcomes. Is the planning, process, and evidence a reflection of what we believe in as a school District?
  3. Bridge Building Level Goals: When discussing the mission and vision, it is vital to communicate and bridge the building level goals with the discussion. As teachers are planning, executing, and responding in real time during lessons, having a building level focus such as “student-generated questioning” or “enhancing evidence-informed practices” or “delivering intentional small group instruction” (to name a few) can keep the goals of the conversation grounded and the planning and preparation more focused.
  4. Target Priority Standards: It is recognized that there are a significant number of standards that learners are expected to be exposed to, explore, and in many cases master by the end of a school year. Zoom in on the priority standards and keep the conversation rooted in what standards are critical in helping learners access more complex skills. Consider creating a digital folder of standards that teachers can have access to while planning lessons in one space. Having the standards available will also help guide the conversation to the assessment component of the lesson. It may lead to the question, How will you know if students are accessing the standard during and after the lesson?
  5. Value Teachers as Guides: Allow the teachers to guide the observation conversations. Let them talk about the teaching and learning that transpires in their rooms. Let them share what they are most proud of and what they feel are areas of growth based on student evidence. These authentic discussions show teachers that you value their expertise that could lead to a more organic experience.
  6. Consider Multiple Pathways to Feedback: After an observation, I will never leave a classroom without naming the goodness I saw. I never make the teacher wait to get an observation write up to know what their impact was during that lesson. I talk directly to the teacher and students. I name the work I saw through the experience. “It was amazing to see you using accountable talk stems to lift the level of each other’s thinking together. I can see you and your teacher have been working hard at actively listening to one another so you can add on to the discussion in meaningful ways.” I am also a fan of leaving a digital note, handwritten note, or Voxer message (walkie talkie app) and sending it right to the teacher’s email directly after the lesson. This lets the teacher know that you appreciated being in the room and shows you are a true learning partner in the process.
  7. Growth Through Coaching Conversations: Ask good questions that will spark learner-driven conversations. They will lead you to identifying and focusing on a problem of practice. Questions such as: What worked well for you during our collaboration and coaching cycle? How has your teaching been positively impacted? How do you feel our collaboration has positively impacted the students? What were any challenges or missed opportunities during our work together? What are some next steps in your teaching?
  8. Recommend Relevant Resources: Like a teacher, every instructional leader should have a bag of tricks available and ready to support and grow an educator during any given conversation. Keeping yourself well-versed on up-to-date articles, books, and practical resources teachers can use to apply in their classroom TOMORROW is a great investment in the teaching and learning deposit box. Recently I recommended Evolving Education by Dr. Katie Martin to a teacher. After watching a lesson that was learner-driven, personalized, and innovative, I wanted to be able to get a seasoned teacher to productively seek out new ways to take incredible existing practices and make small shifts that will have big impact. As this particular teacher is reading the book, she is sharing what parts resonated and how she is implementing some of the ideas. For example, she took the School Learner Profile exemplar on page 16 of the book AND our District mission and vision, and created a learner profile that was in line with her classroom community values.

Moving Forward

So I ask school leaders, will you consider working to shift the narrative of observations by observing through a coaching lens? Every interaction you have as a coach and thinking partner is an opportunity to build community, lift the level of conversations, and transform practices in the most meaningful, productive ways. As my principal shared with our staff, “Michael Phelps’ coach is not better than him at swimming, he is there to support his growth and provide feedback so he can be better.” He is there to help him see things he can’t see himself.